Manjaro: A Different Kind of Beast

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Although Manjaro is Arch-based and Arch compatible, it is not Arch. As such, far from being just an an easy-to-install or pre-configured version of Arch, Manjaro is actually a very different kind of beast.

In fact, the differences between Manjaro and Arch are far greater than the differences between the popular Ubuntu distribution and its many derivatives, including Mint and Zorin. To help provide a clearer understanding of Manjaro, a few of its main features have been outlined.


Overview

  • Manjaro is developed independently from Arch, and by a completely different team.
  • Manjaro is designed to be accessible to newcomers, while Arch is aimed at experienced users.
  • Manjaro draws software from its own independent repositories. These repositories also contain software packages not provided by Arch.
  • Manjaro provides its own distribution-specific tools such as the Manjaro Hardware Detection (mhwd) utility, and the Manjaro Settings Manager (msm).
  • Manjaro has numerous subtle differences in how it works when compared to Arch.


A more detailed outline of these differences has been provided below.

Dedicated Repositories

Note: An important benefit from Manjaro's use of its own repositories is that the developers will automatically implement critical updates on your behalf, and there will therefore be no need for you to intervene manually.


To ensure continued stability and reliability, Manjaro utilises its own dedicated software repositories. With the exception of the community-maintained Arch User Repository (AUR), Manjaro systems do not –and cannot– access the official Arch repositories. More specifically, popular software packages initially provided by the official Arch repositories will first be thoroughly tested (and if necessary, patched), prior to being released to Manjaro's own Stable Repositories for public use.

Manjaro actually uses three types of repositories:

  • Unstable: About a day or two behind Arch, this is also used to store software packages that have known or suspected stability and/or compatibility issues. This software may therefore be subject to patching by the Manjaro developers prior to being released to the testing repositories. Although the very latest software will be located here, using the unstable respositories may consequently break your system!


  • Testing: Usually about a week or so behind Arch, these are used to store patched software packages from the unstable repositories, as well other new software releases that are considered at least sufficiently stable. This software will be subject to further checks by developers and testers for potential bugs and/or stability issues, prior to being released to the stable repositories for public use.


  • Stable: Usually about two weeks behind Arch, these are the default repositories used by Manjaro systems to provide updates and downloads to the general user base.


A consequence of accommodating this testing process is that Manjaro will never be quite as bleeding-edge as Arch. Software may be released to the stable repositories days, weeks, or potentially even months later; however, users who wish to access the very latest releases can still do so by enabling access to the Unstable Repository or the Testing Repository… at their own risk!

Exclusive User-Friendly Tools

Another feature that sets Manjaro apart from Arch and other Arch-based distributions is its focus on user-friendliness and accessibility. This extends far beyond just providing an easy graphical installer and pre-configured desktop environments. Manjaro also provides a range of powerful tools developed exclusively by the Manjaro Team, including:


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Manjaro Hardware Detection (mhwd)

The mhwd command enables the automatic detection and configuration of your hardware for you, usually undertaken during the installation process. This includes support for hybrid graphics cards, as well as setting everything up such as module dependencies for Virtualbox virtual machine installations; however, it can also be used by users with limited technical knowledge to easily undertake this task for themselves.

A guide on how to manually configre graphics cards has been provided.


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Manjaro Hardware Detection Kernel (mhwd-kernel)

While automatic support for the use of multiple kernels is a defining feature of Manjaro, the mhwd-kernel command also empowers users with no technical knowledge to easily manage them as well. This includes automatically updating any newly installed kernels with any modules being used, such as those required to run Manjaro within Virtualbox.

A guide on how to manage kernels has been provided.


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Manjaro Settings Manager (msm)

This user-friendly application allows you to quickly and easily manage user accounts, install new language packs, and even switch your system's default language and keyboard layout on-the-fly. msm will also automatically notify you of any updates available for installed language packs, too.


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Pamac - The Graphical Software Manager

Exclusively developed by the Manjaro Team, this intuitive application allows you to easily search for, install, remove, and update software applications and packages. pamac will also automatically notify you of any updates; keep your system up-to-date with just a single click!

So, in Conclusion...

Manjaro is definitely a beast, but a very different kind of beast than Arch. Fast, powerful, and always up to date, Manjaro provides all the benefits of an Arch operating system, but with an especial emphasis on stability, user-friendliness and accessibility for newcomers and experienced users alike.

Any enquires about the Manjaro operating system should therefore be directed towards the Manjaro Forums or Manjaro Internet Relay Chat (IRC) channels in order to receive the best help and support possible. All are welcome!

See Also